The recipe from the picture

I made these for a cookie exchange last year, and as a gift for a friend who
doesn't bake, so she could give them to her boyfriend, who's mother made them
every year. The recipe is just how I got it from the mother, with my comments
in footnotes (because I am a nerd). 
 
I copied-n-pasted this from an MSWord document. I'd make it all one font 
if I could (because I am a nerd about that too).
 
CANDY CANE COOKIES (about 4 dozen) (1)
 
(You will need to get a box or bag of cheapest small candy canes or 
peppermints (2) --you can find and crush enough to make 1/2 Cup or more
--I use a blender--noisy but fast--or a hammer and heavy bag works too.)
 
1 cup shortening (half butter or margarine)
1 cup confectioner's sugar
1 egg 
1-1/2 tsp almond extract (3)
1 tsp vanilla 
 
2/1/2 Cups flour
1 tsp salt
 
1/2 tsp red food coloring
 
1/2 cup crushed peppermint candy
1/2 cup granulated sugar
 
Heat over to 375F. Mix shortening, sugar, egg and flavorings thoroughly. 
 
Measure flour and mix with salt; stir into shortening mixture.
 
Divide dough in half. Blend food coloring into one half.
 
Roll a 4" strip (abt. 1 tsp dough) from each color. For smooth, even 
strips, roll them back and forth on lightly floured board. Place strips 
side by side, press lightly together and twist like a rope. 
Curve top = candy cane! (4) For best results, complete cookies one at a 
time--if all the dough of one color is shaped first, strips become 
too dry to twist. (5)
 
Place on ungreased baking sheet. (6) Bake about 9 min. until lightly browned. (7) 
While still on pan and hot, sprinkle with mixture of candy and sugar. (8) 
Let cool a minute or two and remove with spatula.
 

(1) I don't remember how many the recipe really made, but it was less than four 
dozen. To double the recipe I made two batches of dough, and dyed one red.
 
(2) Bob's are Best:                                          
 
(3) I used 1/2 tsp almond, 1/2 tsp peppermint extract, and 1 tsp vanilla.
 
(4) Make circle = wreath! I did canes for the boyfriend, since they were 
Cookies From Childhood, but I thought wreaths would be less fragile for the
cookie exchange. The bows were melted mint chips:                                              

(5) They were easier to work with if I kept the dough in the refrigerator and only took out one or two balls at a time. I also put the shaped cookies into the freezer for a few minutes before I baked them, so they wouldn't spread.

 

(6) I lined the pans with parchment paper. Foil would work too.

(7) Mine took 14 minutes, but that might be because of the freezer thing.

(8) That's why the parchment paper was a good thing. 

 

These weren't hard, but they were fiddly. I don't know what I'm going to make for the cookie exchange this year.

 

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7 Responses to The recipe from the picture

  1. Brown Suga' says:

    Wowwwwwww…..

    [melts]

  2. pyrl says:

    T.H.A.N.K.Y.O.U. P.E.G.of.T.I.L.L.I.N.G.I shall thank thee grandly now because I may be cursing you later!!!!I'll let you know how it goes. Ha. Maybe play by play.

  3. Just keep the dough cold, and check the cookies halfway through the baking time and turn the pan around so everything bakes evenly…I usually spoon flour into the measuring cup instead of sticking the cup in the flour bin–I don't know if that will make a difference. Good luck! Looking forward to hearing how it comes out!

  4. pyrl says:

    I'm going to try to get the recipe ingredients today. I'll let you know soon as I have time to make them. In the Flickr set, the polar bear cookies are so cute!

  5. pyrl says:

    Oh, and I'm thinking of enlisting the help of the French Foreign Legion. 😉

  6. pyrl says:

    (whirr, whaa, whirr, whaa) That's my printer printing out your recipe. Then I'm off to the store. Finally. May have time to make, I mean attempt, these on Thursday?

  7. From the weather it looks like you'll have no trouble keeping the dough cold…the French Foreign Legion are often stationed in dessert countries, so they'd be very helpful…

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